Saturday, September 12, 2015

Codename: Wildgeese - Lewis Collins (1984) - Far East Finance Centre, Central

A highly recognisable Central landmark courtesy of its rather 'striking' (i.e. naff) gold coloured windows. We've seen it on this blog before where it served as the HQ of Jackie Chan's enemy (played by Roy Chiao) in The Protector. In this film it also houses the offices of one of Collins's sponsors. It's featured a couple of times from various angles so here are screencaps from both occasions. The first one taken from the vantage point of ground level along Harcourt Road.



The second time we see it, the camera looks to have been placed on  top of the roof of the neighbouring Bank of America Tower (formerly Gammon House before a corruption scandal saw it sold on). You can see that building's reflection in those lovely tasteful shiny windows.


I'm not so sure that the office that the crew used in the film is actually in the Far East Finance Centre, because given the screen shot below - showing the old Furama Hotel almost immediately adjacent - I would hazard a guess and say it was actually shot inside an office inside Bank of America tower. Comments and corrections welcome, as always.

1 comment:

  1. I agree 100%, it has to be shot from the Bank of America tower.

    There's no question that's the Furama's distinctive revolving restaurant projecting from its top, and at 33 stories tall, the adjacent 23-story Hutchison House wasn't tall enough to peer down at it from above.

    Only an office on the western side of the top few floors of the BoA Tower (38 stories) could give you that view. All three buildings can be seen side by side in this Wikipedia image:

    https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Central_from_inland.jpg

    I'm going to go a step further and make an educated guess that it was shot from a top floor office. Reason being that only the top floor of the BoA tower has panoramic windows, as you can see in the first image on Emporis here:

    http://www.emporis.com/buildings/120454/bank-of-america-tower-hong-kong-china

    The lower floors all have much narrower windows, and if you assume that the window in the shot above is symmetrical, it seems too wide to be anything other than a panoramic window.

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